Sussex 1967

Sussex 1967

First real musician job, Deauville Regine Club: 1964

 

Norway and US-based design studio Non-Format has produced some brilliant record sleeves to date - and their latest work for French electronic music producer Black Devil Disco Club (Bernard Fevre)’s Black Moon, White Sun is no exception.The artwork references the album’s title and was inspired by founders Jon Forss and Kjell Ekhorn’s Let’s Dance series – a collection of images featuring contorted characters.“This is our fifth album packaging project for Black Devil Disco Club – despite clear roots in the French disco era of the 1970s, there is a slightly sinister undertone to the music, which we always try to express through the imagery and typography,” say Ekhorn and Forss.

The cover image is a collage composed of stock library shots – it features a dancing figure in black flared leggings, gold shoes and a circular cape (hinting at the moon and sun) made out of what appears to be parachute silk. The back cover features a darker image of the same figure alongside deliberately understated vertical colours of widely spaced sans type.“We’ve always been drawn to album cover images that appear to hint at some kind of narrative but which allow the viewer to make up their own mind as to what the story might be,” they add.

“This is also one of the first albums we’ve designed for Lo Recordings that is released in digital and vinyl LP formats only: no CD. It’s kind of wonderful that we cycle through formats, such as the cassette and the compact disc (and who can remember the MiniDisc?) and yet we still manage to uphold the most physically fragile of them all: the vinyl record. They scratch, they warp, they attract dust like nobody’s business, but despite all this they reign supreme. And, of course, they offer a nice large canvas for expressive designers.”

FULL ARTICLE: http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr-blog/2014/january/record-sleeves-of-the-month

take a look in the past with @lemellotron #viegarantie 

TRACKLIST:
Alan Hurst - Light LineBooker T & The MG’s - Green OnionsCan - A spectacleQuincy Jones - MoaninAphrodite’s Child - The Four HorsemenAccordion Orchestra - Billy JeanBernard Fevre - DaliRaymond Lefèvre - La soupe aux chouxTenebre Soundtrack - FlashingNino Rota - 8 1/2Charlie - Spacer WomanChapeau Melon Et Bottes De CuirEnnio Morricone - Once Upon A TimeAmadeo - MemoriesBlack Devil Disco Club - No RegretsBlack Devil Disco Club - Star Dot ComSnoop Dogg - Can’t Say GoodbyeKlein & MBO - More Dirty TalkImage - Hot StuffBernard Fevre - Molecule Dance
Full article here

take a look in the past with @lemellotron #viegarantie 

TRACKLIST:

Alan Hurst - Light Line
Booker T & The MG’s - Green Onions
Can - A spectacle
Quincy Jones - Moanin
Aphrodite’s Child - The Four Horsemen
Accordion Orchestra - Billy Jean
Bernard Fevre - Dali
Raymond Lefèvre - La soupe aux choux
Tenebre Soundtrack - Flashing
Nino Rota - 8 1/2
Charlie - Spacer Woman
Chapeau Melon Et Bottes De Cuir
Ennio Morricone - Once Upon A Time
Amadeo - Memories
Black Devil Disco Club - No Regrets
Black Devil Disco Club - Star Dot Com
Snoop Dogg - Can’t Say Goodbye
Klein & MBO - More Dirty Talk
Image - Hot Stuff
Bernard Fevre - Molecule Dance

Full article here

interview with Jean-Michel Jarre and Uncle O in Tsugi
Read full article here
“Même si ce n’est pas sensible dans cette interview, Bernard Fèvre aime bien apparaître comme un homme du présent, voire du futur. La soixantaine flamboyante, il endosse une nouvelle fois son pseudo favori pour une aventure moins “nouveau riche” qu’en 2011 où un casting de choix (de Faris Badwan à Jon Spencer en passant par Afrika Bambaataa) avait dilué son propos. Composé sur les mêmes machines qu’il y a quarante ans, Black Moon White Sun à l’esprit très pop, est, selon son auteur, destiné à provoquer une transe chamanique. Sur le dancefloor ou chez soi, décollage garanti.”

interview with Jean-Michel Jarre and Uncle O in Tsugi

Read full article here

Même si ce n’est pas sensible dans cette interview, Bernard Fèvre aime bien apparaître comme un homme du présent, voire du futur. La soixantaine flamboyante, il endosse une nouvelle fois son pseudo favori pour une aventure moins “nouveau riche” qu’en 2011 où un casting de choix (de Faris Badwan à Jon Spencer en passant par Afrika Bambaataa) avait dilué son propos. Composé sur les mêmes machines qu’il y a quarante ans, Black Moon White Sun à l’esprit très pop, est, selon son auteur, destiné à provoquer une transe chamanique. Sur le dancefloor ou chez soi, décollage garanti.”

new music video in the making ‘The Kid In Me’ directed by Piero Glina

http://pieroglina.com/

'2hour-100% Black Devil Disco Club music' dj mix by Elorious Cain & Teknobrat 
Stream here
Read the full article here
Finally a real job mix my music with the musical ear, the inteligence and sensitivity. I rediscovered my work for 2 hours and I thought it was really great. Thanks a lot Elorious Cain & Teknobrat.

'2hour-100% Black Devil Disco Club music' dj mix by Elorious Cain & Teknobrat 

Stream here

Read the full article here

Finally a real job mix my music with the musical ear, the inteligence and sensitivity. I rediscovered my work for 2 hours and I thought it was really great. Thanks a lot Elorious Cain & Teknobrat.

the amazing Non-Format in charge of my album artworks since 2006 have showcased the vinyl version of ‘Black Moon White Sun’. See their super job here: http://non-format.com/black-moon-white-sun

☯ France via Alter K http://bit.ly/16Pl8KC
☯ Rest of the world via Lo Recordings http://bit.ly/1abGRwg
☯ iTunes http://bit.ly/19MaCqI 
☯ Deezer http://bit.ly/1914qvK 
☯ Spotify http://spoti.fi/HbAdzv 
☯ Beatport http://btprt.dj/1akfupQ

From Bibliothèque To Discothèque: The world of library music explored by Jon Tye from Lo Recordings
Much referenced but rarely fully explored, LIbrary music remains a rich source of inspiration for left field producers.
Jon Tye should know - he is one. Writing, recording and releasing inspiring music under a vast variety of pseudonyms, the Lo Recordings lynchpin agreed to set down his thoughts on the Library music phenomenon in this very special Clash primer.
- - -
In 1988 my musical partner (Jan Pomerans) and I were asked to make an album of library music for Bruton Music. At the time we’d never even heard of Library Music; we had produced music for a few Channel 4 trailers and a couple of adverts but this was something else entirely.
After knocking together some demos on our little Portastudio, using the only synth we owned at the time (a Roland SH-101), we suddenly found ourselves in a fully equiped 24-track studio and, thanks to Bruton’s parent company Zomba also owning an equipment hire company, with access to virtually any synth or drum machine we desired including a Fairlight, a machine that at the time retailed for a cool £20,000!
It was the time of house music by the likes of Derrick May and Inner City and before long we were having so much fun making electronic grooves that playing in a standard rock band with drum kits, rehearsal rooms, vans and all the rest that bands entail began to seem rather drab in comparison.
Eventually the album came out and wel… nothing happened… and I mean nothing… So suitably chastened we stopped making Library Music and Jan even moved to Los Angeles. Then two years later something out of the blue happened: the cheques started to come in and they were fat! As it happened, no one had explained to us that it actually takes around two to three years before you see income from Library music, but it does and that’s exactly what happened for us.
Having fallen in love with making music using electronic instruments, I went on to make records for Gee St, Arista, Rising High, R&S, Ninja Tune and others before starting the Lo Recordings label in 1995. It was around this time that Trunk records released the Bosworth Library music compilations and suddenly Library music seemed to be everywhere. Luke Vibert, Coldcut and Andrew Weatherall were sampling it,  the legendary Gwen Jamois was unearthing and selling it, and its musical aesthetic seemed to offer endless possibilities. Still given what a huge influence and resource Library Music has been it’s incredible how little info is available about it.
FULL ARTICLE ON CLASH MAG

From Bibliothèque To Discothèque: The world of library music explored by Jon Tye from Lo Recordings

Much referenced but rarely fully explored, LIbrary music remains a rich source of inspiration for left field producers.

Jon Tye should know - he is one. Writing, recording and releasing inspiring music under a vast variety of pseudonyms, the Lo Recordings lynchpin agreed to set down his thoughts on the Library music phenomenon in this very special Clash primer.

- - -

In 1988 my musical partner (Jan Pomerans) and I were asked to make an album of library music for Bruton Music. At the time we’d never even heard of Library Music; we had produced music for a few Channel 4 trailers and a couple of adverts but this was something else entirely.

After knocking together some demos on our little Portastudio, using the only synth we owned at the time (a Roland SH-101), we suddenly found ourselves in a fully equiped 24-track studio and, thanks to Bruton’s parent company Zomba also owning an equipment hire company, with access to virtually any synth or drum machine we desired including a Fairlight, a machine that at the time retailed for a cool £20,000!

It was the time of house music by the likes of Derrick May and Inner City and before long we were having so much fun making electronic grooves that playing in a standard rock band with drum kits, rehearsal rooms, vans and all the rest that bands entail began to seem rather drab in comparison.

Eventually the album came out and wel… nothing happened… and I mean nothing… So suitably chastened we stopped making Library Music and Jan even moved to Los Angeles. Then two years later something out of the blue happened: the cheques started to come in and they were fat! As it happened, no one had explained to us that it actually takes around two to three years before you see income from Library music, but it does and that’s exactly what happened for us.

Having fallen in love with making music using electronic instruments, I went on to make records for Gee St, Arista, Rising High, R&S, Ninja Tune and others before starting the Lo Recordings label in 1995. It was around this time that Trunk records released the Bosworth Library music compilations and suddenly Library music seemed to be everywhere. Luke Vibert, Coldcut and Andrew Weatherall were sampling it,  the legendary Gwen Jamois was unearthing and selling it, and its musical aesthetic seemed to offer endless possibilities. Still given what a huge influence and resource Library Music has been it’s incredible how little info is available about it.

FULL ARTICLE ON CLASH MAG

And now where is it the black devil ? the first good response wins… Nothing (from FB)

And now where is it the black devil ? the first good response wins… Nothing (from FB)